Mobile Home – 42 Adams Road Unit 23 Greenfield, MA 01301 is now back on the market!

Great opportunity for affordable living in Tenant Owned Mobile Home Park at Greenfield Country Estates. Built in the 1960’s in Pittston, Pennsylvania by Ambassador Mobile Homes this Single Wide Unit has a fresh coat of paint inside, updated electric, new light fixtures, refinished bathtub, is neat and clean and ready for move-in. Attached carport is partially enclosed. Storage Shed. Washer & Dryer included. Park Fees include Taxes, Road Maintenance and Plowing, Trash, Water & Sewer.

This property features 4 total rooms, 1 full bath, 2 bedrooms, and is currently available for $34,000.

For complete details click here.

Mobile Home – 42 Adams Rd Unit 25 Greenfield, MA 01301 is now new to the market!

Large lot with perennial gardens and storage shed. This mobile home has replacement windows, covered patio area with attached storage shed.Located close to route 2 and route 91. Lot rent is $240.00 per month and includes taxes, water, sewer, trash removal and street snow plowing. Buyers must be approved by the park committee.

This property features 4 total rooms, 1 full bath, 2 bedrooms, and is currently available for $33,500.

For complete details click here.

Mobile Home – 42 Adams Road Unit 23 Greenfield, MA 01301 is now new to the market!

Great opportunity for affordable living in Tenant Owned Mobile Home Park at Greenfield Country Estates. Built in the 1960’s in Pittston, Pennsylvania by Ambassador Mobile Homes this Single Wide Unit has a fresh coat of paint inside, updated electric, new light fixtures, refinished bathtub, is neat and clean and ready for move-in. Attached carport is partially enclosed. Storage Shed. Washer & Dryer included. Park Fees include Taxes, Road Maintenance and Plowing, Trash, Water & Sewer.

This property features 4 total rooms, 1 full bath, 2 bedrooms, and is currently available for $34,000.

For complete details click here.

Living in a Mobile Home Neighborhood

People who have lived in a subdivision may find it easier to adjust to living in a mobile home park, especially if they relocate to a mobile home park that’s moments away from public transportation, businesses and stores. Another way to adjust to living in a mobile home park is to buy a home in a small park, a neighborhood that has 15 or fewer mobile homes in it.

Besides location, another factor that determines what you can expect while living in a mobile home community is the styles of the homes. Large mobile homes look like traditional houses, some of the homes being built with two stories. The look and feel of these mobile home communities is very similar to a typical neighborhood.

People mistakenly undervalue mobile home communities

Yet, there are differences that living in a mobile home community brings. If you live in a community whose residents are confident and positively contributing to society, adjustments that you might have to make include:

  • Working with a cable television provider to install underground cable so that you can watch your favorite cable channels.
  • Paying higher utility bills, especially higher electric bills, if you buy a mobile home that was made before the late 1990s. Utility bills at an older mobile home could run you several thousand dollars a year extra. To reduce your utility bills more, try heating your home with solar panels. Just make sure that the savings isn’t offset by high solar panel installment costs.
  • Rent to own mobile homes can make home ownership more affordable. As with any deal, read the small print. Look for rent to own contracts that allow you to recoup a portion of your investment should you decide not to buy the mobile home.
  • Although it’s your home, you may have to pay a monthly pet fee, similar to how you pay a fee to keep a pet in an apartment. Because mobile homes tend to be placed close together, ask for maximum size dogs that are allowed in the mobile home park you’re considering buying a house in. If you’re not a fan of dogs, you might want to avoid moving to a park that permits large dogs or dogs that love to bark to move in.
  • During severe weather, you and your neighbors’ nerves might get frayed. Should storms become especially strong, pay attention to local government and weather instructions. Vacate the mobile home park if necessary. You could always return after the storm passes. Buy a mobile home that’s built with 100% drywall, quality siding, reliable thermal windows and solid roofing to improve the chances that your home won’t incur damage during mild storms. Also, opt for a mobile home that meets the latest building codes.
  • You’ll still have to pay property taxes.
  • Because your homes are close to each other, you might find it easier to get to know your neighbors.

Mobile homes don’t determine a person’s behavior. Caring, intelligent and cultural people live at mobile home parks. In fact, some parks are quiet and very well kept. As with any community, ask neighbors what it’s like living in the particular mobile home park. Also, ask realtors and mobile home managers about the neighbors. You could move into a retirement community, a depressed neighborhood, a vacation area or an upscale mobile home park.